Choose at least one important element in film interpretation (issues that might be examined include cultural perspectives, cinematic time, narrative trajectory, and fore structure) and illustrate your answer by illustrating it in one or more films.

Film

Use the ESSAY Answer Template for your answers. (I attached it)

You are required to write a total of three essays, one essay for each section (A, B, and C). Each answer must be a minimum of 600 words (but please, no more than 750 words).

You may write about each film ONLY ONCE.  So each section will have different film.

You may write ONLY on films viewed in class. Films viewed outside of class are NOT eligible for analysis.

Indicate, by number, your answers.

It is very important that you support your analytical points with specific illustrations (cinematic evidence) from course films.

Eligible Films:

  • Casablanca
  • Double Indemnity
  • The Graduate
  • Goodfellas
  • The Silence of the Lambs
  • Ladybird
  • Wonder Woman
  • Moonlight
  • Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
  • The Imitation Game
  • Ex Machina
  • Interstellar

 

SECTION A.  Answer one of the following prompts.

  1. Choose one genre of cinema (as outlined in the lectures, not as presented in the textbook): Classical, Modern, or Postmodern. In your essay, show how one or more films characterize this genre. Be sure to define and discuss the fundamental elements of this genre as suggested in the course lectures.
  2. Compare and contrast two genres of cinema (Classical, Modern, or Postmodern), illustrating your answer by discussing one or more films. Be sure to define and discuss the fundamental elements of these genres as suggested in the course lectures.
  3. Choose at least one important element in film interpretation (issues that might be examined include cultural perspectives, cinematic time, narrative trajectory, and fore structure) and illustrate your answer by illustrating it in one or more films.

 

SECTION B: Select two or more terms/concepts and apply them to one or more films viewed in class.

diegetic sound / non-diegetic sound / ambient sound / crane shot / framing / reframing / establishing shot / master shot / extreme close-up / close-up / medium shot / long shot / extreme long shot / Steadicam / slow motion / fast motion / chiaroscuro / deep focus cinematography / high-key lighting / low-key lighting / continuity editing / cutting on action / freeze-frame / shot/reverse shot / fade-in / fade-out / wipe / dissolve / montage / long take / climax / realism / antirealism / verisimilitude / voiceover / characterization / flat character / round character / cinematic time / flashback / flash-forward / inciting moment / omniscient point-of-view / single character point-of-view / group point-of-view / parallel editing / jump cuts / split screens

 

SECTION C: Select TWO issues from the list below and apply them to one or more films viewed in class.

  1. Cultural assumptions of society and audiences
  2. Character Stereotyping
  3. Relationships, including love
  4. Issues of identity
  5. Images of women
  6. Issues of Technology, including AI and Robotics
  7. Issues of gender
  8. Journey motif(s)
  9. Themes of nostalgia and loss
  10. Comic irony/satire/parody
  11. Racial and ethnic portraits
  12. American myth
  13. Degradation/corruption
  14. Portraits of Romance
  15. Strategic or critical moment in a film
  16. Ethical issues
  17. Terror, horror, fear
  18. International representations
  19. Uses of violence
  20. Issues of obsession
  21. Coming of age narrative
  22. Representations of urban life
  23. Representations of rural life